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Training Group Agreement

What would someone do if they complied with this agreement? If you have your group agreement, make sure it`s displayed for everyone – ideally, have it written on a whiteboard, paperboard or overhead projector. Trust the group to cover most of the things they need to work well together. If, towards the end of the segment, you feel that some important chords are missing, you only offer one or two supplements. Check whether or not the group wants to adapt your proposals. Keep the agreement for use in future meetings or workshops with the same group, but register each time to make sure everyone is always satisfied. You can, for example, add something to the agreement. In principle, a group agreement consists of statements agreed by the team and the coach that contain behavioural policies during the meeting or workshops. This could include „showing up on time”; „respect each other`s opinions”; „offering everyone the opportunity to speak”; „all points of discussion or opinions that remain confidential.” The most important thing is that the group agreement is decided by the group. As a moderator, you should set up the process and point it in the right direction, but behavioral statements must be determined by the group. Letting the group make these decisions is more effective than someone else can make „rules” for everyone (no one likes to be told what to do). In addition, team members are much more likely to respect and follow an agreement in which they are invested and in which they have had some kind of input.

This will make your job as a coach or meeting presenter much easier. Sometimes participants do not respect the community agreements they put in place for themselves and for others. If this happens, it facilitates everyone`s consent to a particular behaviour. As a training manager or course facilitator, you can report disrespect and ask the class together how they plan to do it. Or you can refer to the agreement and ask the person to change their behaviour so that it is consistent with the agreements. Both are useful, and what you do depends on the time you have and the ubiquity of the problem. The more you can democratize implementation, the more buy-ins you will likely have, so remember that this is an exercise in establishing a common responsibility rather than exensing your authority. If you have additions to your project teams or working groups, take the time to explain the group agreement with them and allow them to propose improvements. This can be done during the break or at the beginning of the workshop as an icebreaker. If you want to include something in the agreement, you should have an interview with the whole group until an agreement is reached.